15-YEAR-OLD BOY DISCOVERS LOST ANCIENT MAYAN CITY

15-YEAR-OLD BOY DISCOVERS LOST ANCIENT MAYAN CITY

15-year-old boy discovers lost ancient Mayan city

About 1700 years ago, they existed, but the ancient Maya had an unbelievable knowledge of the celestial bodies, which they believed influenced everything from harvest to death.

A 15-year-old kid has now researched astronomical charts of these ancient Mexicans people and satellite images to show the position in a forgotten Maya region. William Gadoury, from Quebec has named the ‘lost city’ in the Yucatan jungle K’aak Chi, or Mouth of Fire.

Gadoury has named the newly discovered Mayan metropolis K’aak Chi, after reading about their 2012 apocalypse prediction.

Satellite images show that the lost city may be one of the largest buildings built between 300 and 700 AD by the ancient civilization. As the Mayans worshipped the stars, wondering why the ancient people founded their city far away from the rivers and in inhospitable mountains led the teenager to look to the sky for answers.

Gadoury came up with a theory the Maya built their cities so they lined up with star constellations. The teenager analysed 23 Mayan constellations to realize if he connected them, the 142 stars corresponded to the position of 177 Mayan cities.

Gadoury came up with a theory the Maya built their cities so they lined up with star constellations. The teenager analysed 23 Mayan constellations to realise if he connected them, the 142 stars corresponded to the position of 177 Mayan cities.

Gadoury came up with a theory the Maya built their cities so they lined up with star constellations. The teenager analysed 23 Mayan constellations to realise if he connected them, the 142 stars corresponded to the position of 177 Mayan cities.

The photographs revealed linear features that ‘stuck out,’ Daniel De Lisle, from the Canadian Space Agency told The Independent.

‘There are linear features that would suggest there is something underneath that big canopy,’ he said.

Armand La Rocque, from the University of New Brunswick believes one of the images shows network of streets leading to a large square, which may be a pyramid.

Satellite images compared with Google Earth show potentially man-made structures beneath the jungle canopy.

‘A square is not natural, it is mostly artificial and can hardly be attributed to natural phenomena,’ he said.  It’s possible 30 buildings accompany an impressive pyramid at the site.

If true, the lost city would be one of the five largest known to archaeologists, built by the Mayans.

Mr de Lisle told The Journal of Montreal: ‘What is fascinating about the project of William, is the depth of his research.

William Gadoury, 15, explains his theory of the existence of a Mayan city still unknown in Mexico before scientists at the Canadian Space Agency.

‘Linking the position of stars and the location of a lost city and the use of satellite images on a tiny territory to identify the remains buried under dense vegetation, is quite exceptional.’

Dr la Rocque thinks William Gadoury’s technique could lead archaeologists to pinpointing the location of more possible lost Mayan metropolises.

The teenager would like to see the Mayan’s Mouth of Fire for himself and as yet, no-one has ventured into the jungle to confirm his ‘find’.

Gadoury’s discovery will be presented at Brazil’s International Science fair in 2017 and published in a journal.



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